Farewell Trials of Apollo, thanks for the learnings

 Farewell Trials of Apollo, thanks for the learnings

Sukriti Tankha

Whenever I’m asked about my hobbies, reading always tops the list. Being an avid reader, my favourite author during my growing up years was Enid Blyton. I’m her biggest fan and I think I have all of her books and have read them over and over again. But then you move and I too did. When in class 10, I realised that I had crossed the age when her books appealed to me. However, she will forever and forever remain the best author I have read.

And as luck would have it, one day I got The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan as a gift. It was more than a welcome change. Ever since, I have purchased and read each and every one of Riordan’s books and I can’t ever get enough of Percy Jackson. Needless to say, when the Trials of Apollo series started, I was very excited to read about a god. And as always is the case with Riordan’s books, I just could never stop reading.

So now, in 2020, with everyone stuck at home due to Coronavirus scare, I had one thing to look forward to – the release of Tower of Nero. I purchased it as soon as it released but then had to wait for a couple of weeks before getting to read it, thanks to my online BDS exams.

When I finally started reading it, it was an out-of-the-world experience. Though it is the same with all of Riordan’s books, this being the final one in the Percy Jackson series made me cry and laugh with Apollo a little more. Apollo is finally facing his last and most dangerous enemies, Nero and Python. And along with Meg, must defeat them in order to restore the balance of Olympus and get his God self-back.

 

The journey of Apollo from being a god to a human and then back to god is so complete and fulfilling to read. He learns how to be human, experiences friendship, love, hate, tragedy – all of it which he had never experienced after centuries on Earth

 

To do so, they formulate a plan and with the help of some new and some old friends manage to defeat Nero and Python. The book has the perfect amount of humour and lessons of life entwined together in the typical Rick Riordan style. The journey of Apollo from being a god to a human and then back to god is so complete and fulfilling to read. He learns how to be human, experiences friendship, love, hate, tragedy – all of it which he had never experienced after centuries on Earth – while never losing the charm of what makes him “him”.

This book certainly feels like a finale with every one of our beloved characters making an appearance, from the Percy-Annabeth-Grover trio to Will, Nico to Piper to Mr D, Chiron and even Jason whose sacrifice is never once overlooked. Apollo and Meg’s journey has been as difficult as it could be but they’ve definitely emerged as better versions of themselves. However, I’m more proud of Meg for having overcome years of mental and emotional abuse and emerging as a beautiful person in the end – all at the age of 12.

 

There are so many lessons to be learnt, so many people to get inspired from but it never feels preachy or forced. Rick Riordan never fails to make you laugh, cry, hate, love and admire. Most importantly, there are learnings in his books

 

Throughout the book, there are so many lessons to be learnt, so many people to get inspired from but it never feels preachy or forced which perhaps is one of the reasons why Rick Riordan is not only my favourite author today but that of millions around the world. He never fails to make me laugh, cry, hate, love and admire but most importantly, get learnings from his books. That’s why I’m sad to bid this series a farewell, especially the haikus at the start of each chapter as they’re my absolute favourites.

However, I’m secretly still hoping for magic to happen after this because as Will said in this book, “No story ever ends, does it? It just leads into others.” Hope, it does…

 

 

Life&More

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